So is blue for boys, and pink for girls?

So is blue for boys, and pink for girls?

This may be generally true today, but these gender-specific colours are a modern, social construct.

It seems like this happened some time around the 1940s. It is no coincidence that this binary transformation coincided with the so-called ‘golden age of advertising.

If you get the chance to browse a catalogue from the 1970s, you’ll struggle to find a big difference between the colours of boys’ and girls’ clothing and toys. What’s even more surprising is that for a long time before this, people associated blue with females and pink with males.

Before this 20th Century shift:

  • Pink was always seen as representing: Blood, aggression and the Sacred Heart…
  • Whilst blue represented: Serenity, Calm skies / lakes and the Virgin Mary.

It’s fair to say EURO 2016 football fans understand branding

It’s fair to say EURO 2016 football fans understand branding

Have you ever met an Everton fan who refuses to wear a red tie for work? Or an Aston Villa / West Ham United fan who shudders at the thought of a slightly darker blue sleeve? Football fans are known as being among some of the most ‘brand loyal’ people around. None more-so than international football fans, as the colour wheel above illustrates.

A design for life

A design for life